Jill Dando’s brother believes a ‘misguided person’ was to blame

Jill Dando’s brother has revealed his personal theory about who shot his sister outside her home in Fulham 20 years ago.Ahead of a new BBC One documentary which airs tonight, The Murder of Jill Dando, Nigel, 66, appeared on Lorraine to have his say on one of the most high profile unsolved murder cases in the UK. While TV presenter Lorraine Kelly discussed the many theories suggested at the time, including a professional hitman and also a stalker, Nigel explained his own idea.  ‘I tend to think it wasn’t a professional hit. I think you can rule out the Serbian hitman, which was a popular theory that was doing the rounds at the time,’ said Nigel, whose sister was murdered aged 37. ‘For what it’s worth, my belief is that it was just a misguided individual on the street on the day, with a firearm, who knew where Jill lived, and who just ‘struck lucky’.’For whatever reason, that person was in that street and did what that person did. I doubt we will ever know now because of the passage of time.’ Nigel Dando, 66, appeared on Lorraine this morning to reveal his personal theory about who shot his sister outside her home in Fulham 20 years ago The brother of the former BBC broadcaster (pictured) explained that he doesn’t think a hit man was responsible but instead believes a ‘misguided individual’ on the street on the day just ‘struck lucky’Proceeding to explain his theory, Nigel revealed that Jill’s lifestyle at the time meant she wasn’t guaranteed to be in a certain place at any given time. ‘I think it was a relatively random act [given] Jill’s lifestyle at the time, as she wasn’t regularly at home. You couldn’t say that every ‘Monday morning at 11 ‘o’ clock she would be there.’He added: ‘On the day in question, she had left her fiancé Alan’s home in Chiswick and had briefly gone to her home in Fulham to pick something up. Then I think she was off somewhere else in London for a fitting for her wedding dress, of course they were going to get married shortly. So it was that random.’  BBC Crimewatch presenter Jill Dando, 37, was shot dead outside her west London home in April 1999Nigel went on to say that the police carried out an exhaustive check of CCTV and plotted Jill’s journey. ‘There were photographs and thousands of phone calls being made in that area at the relevant time and there was nothing that jumped out for example that suggested she was being followed at her home that day,’ he explained. ‘Neighbours talked of a strange man in the streets and various descriptions of that person. If it was that person who pulled the trigger we’ll never know now.’He added on the multiple theories: ‘All avenues have to be investigated by police. In the early days, who knew what it might be or more importantly what the motive might have been.”The weeks have turned to months, and the months have turned to years, and the years have turned to decades, and no one has been convicted of Jill’s murder so I tend to think it wasn’t a professional hit.’   Speaking to the Scottish presenter (left), Nigel also explained that he doesn’t think his familt we ever get the answers they’ve been after for 20 years. ‘I doubt we will ever know now because of the passage of time,’ he said on today’s show While knowing who was responsible for his sister’s murder was important for Nigel, he was more keen to know why and the motive behind itWhen asked by the Scottish presenter why now felt like the right time to speak out and share his beliefs, Nigel explained: ‘There were times particularly in the aftermath of the murder that I was asked to do a lot of interviews. I did what I could, but I was concerned anything I might say my inadvertently prejudice police inquiries.’And he revealed that even 20 years on, it’s still tough to relive the horrific ordeal.’It was a very difficult time and difficult to come to terms with as it is now – 20 years on. But you can’t live in the past,’ Nigel said. ‘Personally, I can’t become obsessive about it. You never forget but you have to move on.’ Theories behind the unsolved murder  IRA revenge killingOne theory is that the IRA targeted the BBC broadcaster because of her links to police through her work presenting CrimewatchWayne Aird was serving a life sentence in prison for killing a man two months after Jill Dando was shotHe claimed the IRA was responsible for her death but had not been brought to justice due to concerns it may jeopardise the Northern Ireland peace processPaedophile ringIn 2014, an anonymous source who is believed to have worked with Jill Dando revealed she was trying to expose a VIP paedophile ring just months before her deathThe friend reportedly told the Daily Express: ‘I don’t recall the names of all the stars now and don’t want to implicate anyone, but Jill said they were surprisingly big names.’StalkerDando had a large following due to her TV career, leading the police to believe an opportunistic individual may have been responsible The police identified 140 people who were ‘obsessed’ with the star. Adding to the theory, one of Jill’s neighbours revealed he had seen a sighting of the possible killer – a 6ft white man aged around 40. In the statement he said he heard a surprised cry from Jill ‘like someone greeting a friend’, suggesting she may have known her murdererJoe the barman  In 1996 Kenneth Noye was sentenced to life in prison for a road rage killing with the help of a Crimewatch TV appeal – could this have been an act of revenge? Serbian mafia   15 days before Jill’s murder Serbian journalist Slavko Curuvija was shot dead outside his home in BelgradeDetectives were informed Serbian mobsters who were residing in the UK plotted the assassination over drinks at a nightclubA message sent to detectives claimed they carried out the hit in revenge for the Nato-led bombing of a Serbian TV station – but this theory has since been discredited by the Daily Mail A professional hit Barry George, 58, was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2001, but was acquitted seven years later after his conviction was quashed and a retrial orderedAfter his release, a review suggested the killing had signs of a professional hit – particularly the ‘hard contact execution – which involves pressing the gun against the head to silence the shot and minimise the blood on the killer’s clothesAn intelligence report identified two suspects from a known London crime family, suggesting the murder could have been in retaliation for a Crimewatch investigation  But the real question that continues to haunt both Jill’s brother and his family is not so much who committed the crime, but more why.   ‘It is important to know who did it but for me, to an extent, it’s more important to know why,’ he explained. ‘What was the motive? I’m not aware Jill had any enemies at all that she had upset anybody. What you saw was what you got with Jill. That’s what for 20 years has baffled her nearest and dearest.’Speaking to the BBC on Monday, Nigel said: ‘I will eventually find answers… no matter how long it takes.’He added the unsolved case ‘still leaves the questions open of who killed Jill and why. At the moment these questions are still open-ended and still haven’t been answered.’ One of the more prominent theories led police to believe a Serbian hit man may have been responsible. In the early hours of April 24, a Nato missile hit the Belgrade headquarters of Radio Television Serbia — an equivalent of the BBC. Nato chiefs said the station was targeted because it was used to broadcast inflammatory propaganda. Seventeen RTS staff were killed in the attack.Two days later Jill Dando was shot dead on her doorstep in Gowan Avenue, Fulham. Michael Mansfield QC told the court that the National Criminal Intelligence Service had a dossier which suggested the killing was in retaliation for the Belgrade TV station bombing.But on Sunday, The Daily Mail discredited the theory, revealing that an MI5 officer paid a secret visit to the Old Bailey during the trial to reassure the prosecution team there was no credible evidence to support the defence’s contention. The first jury to hear the case also rejected Mr Mansfield’s theory.  In the documentary airing tonight, the detective who led the first Jill Dando murder investigation has claimed it is unlikely anyone else will stand trial for killing the BBC Crimewatch presenter.Hamish Campbell, a Detective Chief Inspector in the Metropolitan Police at the time of the killing, helped convict Barry George of shooting the broadcaster dead outside her home in Fulham 20 years ago. Former stuntman Mr George, 58, was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2001, but was acquitted seven years later after his conviction was quashed and a retrial ordered.The case remains unsolved, but Mr Campbell revealed how he does not believe anybody else will ever stand trial for murdering Miss Dando, 37, outside her west London home in April 1999.  Hamish Campbell (pictured), the detective who led the first murder investigation, has said he does not believe anybody else will ever stand trial for murdering Miss DandoHe said: ‘Sometimes I felt we were a day away from solving it and other times, I thought ‘no, we’re a long way away’.’Senior officers were asking ‘what are the likelihoods of this case being resolved?”We had over 2,000 people named as potential suspects or responsible. Some actions to trace and eliminate one person might take a day. One action might take two weeks.’But there’s thousands of them and that’s the issue of managing stranger homicides.’The new documentary reveals the decision-making happening behind the scenes of the inquiry into Miss Dando’s murder.It will show how a particle of gunshot residue in the pocket of a coat police found in Barry George’s house became the key forensic evidence against him.  Former stuntman Barry George, 58, was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2001, but was acquitted seven years later after his conviction was quashed and a retrial ordered The new documentary reveals the decision-making happening behind the scenes of the inquiry into Miss Dando’s murderThe gunshot residue evidence was discredited at George’s 2007 appeal, when his murder conviction was quashed. It was deemed inadmissible as evidence at his 2008 retrial, when he was cleared. Mr Campbell and the Metropolitan Police faced criticism after Mr George was cleared, but maintained that they had never used the convicted sex offender as a scapegoat.He said: ‘There’s always been the view, in the media and elsewhere, that the police chose Barry George somehow as a scapegoat and for want of a better word, a patsy, for the investigation team because we couldn’t solve it.’That is somewhat insulting and completely untrue, and wrong.’ It comes days after Mr George told the Daily Mail that he would continue to ‘fight for justice’ following the Government’s refusal to compensate him for the years he spent in prison. Compensation is only paid when the court quashes a conviction because a new fact has emerged to show beyond reasonable doubt that the applicant did not commit the offence.’How can you be acquitted unanimously by judge and jury, which means you (regain) innocent status, but then get told you are not innocent enough?’ he asked us last week. Mr Campbell, pictured in 2000, and the Met Police faced criticism after Mr George was cleared, but maintained that they had never used the convicted sex offender as a scapegoat ‘How more innocent than innocent can a person be? I spent years in custody and then they have looked at the thing and decided I’m not innocent enough.’ Miss Dando’s family still remain ‘hopeful’ her killer will be brought to justice one day. Speaking during the documentary, her brother Nigel said: ‘I would just like to know, why someone would want to kill her.’ The film will also show how BBC director general Tony Hall, then Head of News at the BBC, was targeted with threatening phone calls in the weeks after Jill Dando’s murder.’We had three calls, as I recall, to the BBC switchboards in London and Belfast,’ he said.’I listened to the voice of one of them, which said basically, I was next. I mean they were threatening me. I have no idea what that amounted to, Was it a real threat? Was it not a threat?’You know there are often copycat things that happen after these sorts of events, and the police took it seriously, but I don’t know.’ The Murder of Jill Dando airs on Tuesday at 9pm on BBC One. It will show how a particle of gunshot residue in the pocket of a coat police found in Barry George’s house became the key forensic evidence against him. Pictured: Miss Dando’s home in Fulham
Read More